21 June 2017

Heacham, Norfolk ... again.... :-)


The Vimto Kid and her Mum (above).

I've never known the North Sea to be so warm, it was like bath water on the hottest day in June for 40 years, 32 degrees C or so .... I just wish I'd got me cozzy with me!


...like this fella had.....




A murmuration perhaps .....????  I don't think that the 'Countryfile 2018 Calendar' will be wanting this one though!







Another Springer far more adventurous than me....




Mum was about to put this 'child' on a lead.....





19 June 2017

Heacham in Norfolk, and Wiggenhall St Peter Church Ruins......

Heacham gets its name probably from the River Hitch, there is evidence of settlement in the area for the last 5,000 years, how fab is that!  The village has historic ties to Pocahontas who married John Rolfe who was baptised in the church there.  John Rolfe brought Pocahontas and their son to Heacham Hall in 1616 to visit his family.

The beaches at Heacham are situated on the east banks of The Wash, this means it is one of the few beaches in eastern England where the sun sets over the sea instead of over the land.

The difference in sunset times for the longest and shortest days of the year is about 2½ hours.  In Heacham it is 5½ hours!!  This means that, during mid-Summer, the sun lingers over the task.  So when it is a great sunset (which is very common in Heacham) you have hours to enjoy it. Once the sun goes below the horizon in Heacham it remains light for hours after - often aided by a beautiful moon rising from the East. (Source:- Norfolk Online).

The South Beach.... it was lovely to escape the heat of 32 degrees C in Mildenhall (I thought I'd never see myself write that, being a sun lover!  It must be me age....!)....




All at sea......









Wiggenhall St Peter church ruins.... a 15th century church where the chancel was constructed in 1421.  It was largely intact in the 1920's but was redundant and was in ruins by the 1950's...... this is in the Kings Lynn and West Norfolk district...










Toothache maybe?.....





The River Great Ouse is just a few metres away, a high bank holding back its dangerous waters....





05 May 2017

Thompson Common, Norfolk....

Thompson Common is famous for its pingos - a series of 400 shallow fluctuating pools thought to have been formed at the end of the last Ice Age by the melting of frozen groundwater inside ice-cored hummocks leading to the collapse of their centres.  More than 400 species of plant occur here, as well as many scarce insects, two rare amphibians and an abundant wildlife.  A pingo is also called a hydrolaccolith (a mound of earth covered ice) and is an Inuvialuktan word for a small hill.



































My 'Water Baby' .....












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